Gimme Dat Ding by the Pipkins (Capitol, 1970)

A very bizarre song to hit the Top 10 in 1970. Musically it didn’t sound like anything else at the time, but that’s mostly because it sounded like something from the 20s or at the very least, something you could do the Lindy to. And then there’s the Wolfman Jack-like rap that starts the whole thing off. Written by Albert Hammond & Mike Hazelwood, the guys that also brought you The Air That I Breathe & To All The Girls I’ve Love Before, this song had its origins as part of a psychedelic pop film soundtrack which was a spinoff of a children’s show called Little Big Time. The film, Oliver In The Overworld had 2 soundtracks, one with vocals provided by Freddie Garrity of Freddie & the Dreamers fame and the other with different artists singing the tunes. This is the one with the original Gimme Dat Ding.

The song was a conversation of sorts between a metronome who has lost his ding and a piano. The ding if you will, was its click and he was telling the piano to give it back to him. That’s it. That’s the song. That’s why Mr. Metronome was sad & blue.

Now where the Pipkins come in – that’s a different story. Singer Tony Burrows, who sang anonymously on many studio groups such as Edison Lighthouse, First Class & Brotherhood Of Man, got the call to sing on this one. Once it was recorded, they came up with the stupid band name, put it out and it became a hit. Why? Who knows? And its history doesn’t stop there. Because if you’ve ever watched the Benny Hill Show you recognize the instrumental version of this song playing in the background whenever there was a sketch where a girl’s dress magically fell off and Benny saw her [which was all the time]. From a children’s show to lecherous old man music – quite a legacy.

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1 Comment

  1. J.A. Bartlett

     /  August 18, 2011

    The gruff voice on this record reminds me of Tyrone F. Horneigh, Arte Johnson’s dirty-old-man character on “Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In.” Since “Laugh-In” was still big in the summer of 1970, the association couldn’t have hurt.

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